Maria Hoyos

Maria Hoyos

POP Pavillon

Annie France Leclerc, Benoit Brousseau, Émylie Bernard, Julie Cantin, Julien Gagnon-Rouillard, Karine Madran, Maria Hoyos Raphaël Biscotti and Tristan O'Malley
Montreal
N / A

POP Pavillon

Annie France Leclerc, Benoit Brousseau, Émylie Bernard, Julie Cantin, Julien Gagnon-Rouillard, Karine Madran, Maria Hoyos Raphaël Biscotti and Tristan O'Malley
Montreal
N / A

POP Pavillon

Annie France Leclerc, Benoit Brousseau, Émylie Bernard, Julie Cantin, Julien Gagnon-Rouillard, Karine Madran, Maria Hoyos Raphaël Biscotti and Tristan O'Malley
Montreal
N / A

POP Pavillon

Annie France Leclerc, Benoit Brousseau, Émylie Bernard, Julie Cantin, Julien Gagnon-Rouillard, Karine Madran, Maria Hoyos Raphaël Biscotti and Tristan O'Malley
Montreal
N / A

POP Pavillon

Annie France Leclerc, Benoit Brousseau, Émylie Bernard, Julie Cantin, Julien Gagnon-Rouillard, Karine Madran, Maria Hoyos Raphaël Biscotti and Tristan O'Malley
Montreal
N / A

Maria Hoyos

From montreal, QC

Maria Hoyos's field of research is part of a reflection on art and identity in a decolonial approach. In recent years, sugar has appeared in her work as a symbolic identity element: The history of her hometown Santiago de Cali in Colombia bears witness to a past linked to the colonial production of sugar cane. Today, sugar production is still a symbol of injustice and poverty.